The Physiology of Tai Chi and QiGong – Dr Janke

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Tai Chi and Qigong talk at the world renowned Mayo Clinic Integrative Cancer Center

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Meditation can do many great things for your mind and body…

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10 Scientifically Proven Benefits of Meditation

Wang_Zhanzhuang[13]

Did you know that meditation is scientifically proven to:

1. Overcome stress (University of Massachusetts Medical School, 2003)
2. Boost your creativity (ScienceDaily, 2010)
3. Improve your sex life and increase your libido (The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 2009)
4. Cultivate healthy habits that lead to weight loss (Journal Emotion, 2007)
5. Improve digestion and lower blood pressure (Harvard Medical School)
6. Decrease your risk of heart attack (The Stroke Journal, 2009)
7. Help overcome anxiety, depression, anger and confusion (Psychosomatic Medicine, 2009)
8. Decrease perception of pain and improve cognitive processing (Wake Forest University School of Medicine, 2010)
9. Increase your focus and attention (University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2007)
10. Increase the size of your most important organ— your brain! (Harvard University Gazette, 2006)

http://yoganonymous.com/benefits-of-meditation-10-scientifically-proven-facts/

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Tai Chi: One of the 5 of the best exercises you can ever do according to Harvard Med School

Instructor training

Tai Chi Training

These “workouts” can do wonders for your health. They’ll help keep your weight under control, improve your balance and range of motion, strengthen your bones, protect your joints, prevent bladder control problems, and even ward off memory loss.

No matter your age or fitness level, these activities can help you get in shape and lower your risk for disease:

Swimming. You might call swimming the perfect workout. The buoyancy of the water supports your body and takes the strain off painful joints so you can move them more fluidly. “Swimming is good for individuals with arthritis because it’s less weight bearing,” explains Dr. I-Min Lee, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.
Research finds that swimming can improve your mental state and put you in a better mood. Water aerobics is another option. These classes help you burn calories and tone up.

Tai Chi. Tai chi — a Chinese martial art that incorporates movement and relaxation — is good for both body and mind. In fact, it’s been called “meditation in motion.” Tai chi is made up of a series of graceful movements, one transitioning smoothly into the next. Because the classes are offered at various levels, tai chi is accessible, and valuable, for people of all ages and fitness levels. “It’s particularly good for older people because balance is an important component of fitness, and balance is something we lose as we get older,” Dr. Lee says.

Take a class to help you get started and learn the proper form. You can find tai chi programs at your local YMCA, health club, community center, or senior center.

Strength training. If you believe that strength training is a macho, brawny activity, think again. Lifting light weights won’t bulk up your muscles, but it will keep them strong. “If you don’t use muscles, they will lose their strength over time,” Dr. Lee says.

Muscle also helps burn calories. “The more muscle you have, the more calories you burn, so it’s easier to maintain your weight,” says Dr. Lee. Strength training might also help preserve your ability to remember.

Before starting a weight training program, be sure to learn the proper form. Start light with just one or two pounds. You should be able to lift the weights 10 times with ease. After a couple of weeks, increase that by a pound or two. If you can easily lift the weights through the entire range of motion more than 12 times, move up to slightly heavier weight.

Walking. Walking is simple yet powerful. It can help you stay trim, improve cholesterol levels, strengthen bones, keep blood pressure in check, lift your mood and lower your risk for a number of diseases (diabetes and heart disease for example). A number of studies have shown that walking and other physical activities can improve memory and resist age-related memory loss.

All you need is a well-fitting and supportive pair of shoes. Start with walking for about 10-15 minutes at a time. Over time you can start to walk farther and faster until you’re walking for 30 to 60 minutes on most days of the week.

Kegel exercises. These exercises won’t help you look better, but they do something just as important — strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that support the bladder. Strong pelvic floor muscles can go a long way toward preventing incontinence. While many women are familiar with Kegels, these exercises can benefit men too.

To do a Kegel exercise correctly, squeeze and release the muscles you would use to stop urination or prevent you from passing gas. Alternate quick squeezes and releases with longer contractions that you hold for 10 seconds, and the release for 10 seconds. Work up to three 3 sets of 10-15 Kegel exercises each day.
Many of the things we do for fun (and work) count as exercise. Raking the yard counts as physical activity. So does ballroom dancing and playing with your kids or grandkids. As long as you’re doing some form of aerobic exercise for at least 30 minutes a day, and you include two days of strength training a week, you can consider yourself an “active” person.

Source http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/5-of-the-best-exercises-you-can-ever-do

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Straight Spine, Healthy Spine: A Tai Chi and Qi Gong fundamental principle

Ladies practice Tai Chi in the park

Ladies practice Tai Chi in the park

“There is a Chinese saying that, ‘One need not fear age if one’s spine is still erect.’ A person is old if at thirty their spine is bent; whereas a person of sixty is still young if they comfortably holds their spine upright. The spine carries important networks of nerves to various parts of the body; an upright, relaxed spine facilitates the smooth flow of energy for total harmonious coordination. Practicing chi kung keeps our spines strong, supple, and erect.”

– Grandmaster Wong Kiew Kit

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Improve your balance with Tai Chi

Ladies practice Tai Chi in the park

Ladies practice Tai Chi in the park

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